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Multiconsult has worked in Tanzania since the 1970s. Here from a project that was carried out last year.

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Maulid Shiraz, planning manager i Zanzibar Electricity Corporation, og Multiconsult's Jørn Stave are discussing a small solar power plant on the Kokota island outside Zanzibar.

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From a public meeting about solar power plants on the islands Kokota og Njau outside Zanzibar.

Awarded electric power contract in Tanzania

Multiconsult has signed a four-year framework agreement with the Norwegian embassy in Dar es Salaam on consultancy services related to renewable energy and electricity markets in Tanzania.

21. November, 2018

The embassy currently has a portfolio of electricity and renewable energy projects with a combined value of around one billion Norwegian kroner, and the contract signed covers the following main areas:

  • Assessments and studies related to the embassy’s portfolio of development aid projects involving renewable energy and electricity markets
  • Supporting the embassy’s partners with capacity building and other tasks
  • Energy policy analyses and studies on private sector investment

“After winning the competition with the highest technical score, Multiconsult will automatically be allocated all call-offs worth less than NOK 750,000. We will need to win higher value call-offs in competition with Norconsult and COWI. Our subconsultants for the agreement are Norplan Tanzania, Energy4Impact and PWC”, says Ryan Glenn Anderson, Multiconsult’s Section Manager for Renewable Energy Advisory Services.

He adds that Multiconsult has worked in Tanzania since the 1970s.

“The contract once again demonstrates that Multiconsult is an excellent one-stop-shop for renewable energy and electricity markets in developing countries”, argues Anderson.

Major benefits to society

Multiconsult also had the previous framework agreement with the embassy. Odd Lekva, Multiconsult’s Vice President for Energy Systems, explains that it was productive.

“For example, we were involved in a major capacity building programme with respect to maintaining the power grid on Zanzibar. We also played a key role in advising the Tanzania Rural Energy Agency in its work on rural electrification. In addition, we had a number of smaller consultancy jobs in conjunction with other development aid projects”, says Lekva.

He believes that the new agreement will create opportunities.

“Although we will now have to compete with Norconsult and COWI for the big jobs, the agreement gives us an important role as consultant to the embassy before, during and after the implementation of development aid projects involving renewable energy in Tanzania. The government has announced that development aid for energy projects will be doubled in next year’s budget, which should mean more financial support for Tanzania”, says Lekva.